Thursday, March 13, 2014

custom made

Verse 4.32: All these different types of sacrifice are approved by the Vedas, and all of them are born of different types of work. Knowing them as such, you will become liberated.

Over the past several verses, the Gita has outlined the various ways in which an individual can perform sacrifice. Whether it be by selectively exposing oneself to certain sound vibrations, not giving into every whim and fancy of the mind's demands, or practicing breath control, these are just some of the ways one can practice sacrifice.

What is amazing about the different options presented is that fact that:

Different types of sacrifice, as discussed above, are mentioned in the Vedas to suit the different types of worker...these sacrifices are so arranged that one can work either with the body, with the mind or with the intelligence. (Bg. 4.32 purport)

I love this primarily because it means there's something for everyone. This aspect of personalizing and custom-tailoring any practice is so attractive because it takes into account the fact that every living entity, what to speak of every person, is unique and special.

That's what bhakti is all about - addressing the fundamentals that unite all of us in a very personal way. In this case, the various options outlined for performing sacrifice speaks to the fundamental truth that we are all individuals. What works for someone else may not necessarily work for us. This is something we've all had first hand experience of!

I first discovered this when I was going to school. The way in which the majority of school systems are set up are targeted to a certain type of individual - one that can copy down endless notes and excel when placed in exam environments. But what about those who learn visually? Or those who learn tactically? Or those who cannot handle exam situations? The list can go on and on. Thankfully educators are understanding this more and more and the hope is that in the future there will be programs to address this need.

Bhakti yoga has addressed and continues to address this need to craft a personalized program according to the nature and inclination of a person. It does so not only in the arena of sacrifice but in all the various components that serve to comprise the practice of being able to serve with love and gratitude.

It reminds me of a quote which I'll end with today. Something that captures this essence and always fills me with a sense of hope and inspiration:

"Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid." - Albert Einstein

2 comments:

  1. Nice blog. Its nice to read what you draw from the verse than the verse itself. The very mention of sacrifice confuses me. Swami Narasingha does try to clear the term in his Bhagavad gita commentary, but it'd be better to have another word instead of "sacrifice".

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  2. I am surprised by the lack of comments. You are writing some of the best commentary on the Gita I have ever read. Kudos my friend, Kudos. - Jack, Bali, Indonesia

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